MUSIC: Why Kent and Flosso’s ‘Byafayo’ is the jam that will make your traffic woes disappear

MUSIC: Why Kent and Flosso’s ‘Byafayo’ is the jam that will make your traffic woes disappear

By Trevor Taremwa

One cannot help simply singing along tothis new love anthem from one of the most talented, hard- working and underrated musical duos, Voltage music.

Kent and Flosso sing their souls out to this one girl with whom they promise to write down history in the books of love.

They craft their story carefully, with well thought out lyrics as they sequen- tially narrate their journey, from how they met the girl downtown in a red dress and this, is arguably one of Voltage’s most outstanding efforts.

The production is smooth. A consistent bass tempo fused with subtle piano keys that spells out a love ballad from the word go. The chorus has an infusion of afro beat and RnB that sets pace for the duos effortless delivery.

The song has very rich lyrical prowess. Kent in the opening verse becomes a story teller, narrating how he met this dream girl, downtown, in a red dress as they waited for a train.

The lyrics have rhyme, they tend towards poetry and they paint a very vivid picture and one cannot simply wait for what the video will look like.

In another verse, Flosso alludes to the once popular Televisionseries couple of “Angelo and Ina” as he refers to how great theirlove will be. The lyrical connection is deep.

Kent’s vocal prowess is breathtaking. Ever since the duo’s rstsong, he has taken tremendous strides as far as his vocal deliv- ery and he sure does justice to this song.

On this song, Voltage music not only make love history but also write down musical history as one of the most talented duos we have seen in the industry. Tremendous effort.Very beautiful song.

Source – matookerepublic

Let’s embrace God’s grace in doing His will

Let’s embrace God’s grace in doing His will

By Joe Babendreier

Grace is the gift God gives us so we can do his will. The New Testament uses the word more than a hundred times. The gospels tell us that grace “comes through Jesus Christ”. They say the Angel Gabriel called the Virgin Mary “full of grace”. The Acts of the Apostles was written to “bear witness to the good news of God’s grace”. St Paul wrote in Romans that all Christians “are justified by the free gift of his grace through being set free in Christ Jesus”, noting that “however much sin increases, grace is always greater.”

St James, after clarifying that “faith without works is dead”, went on to state that “God opposes the proud and gives his grace to the humble.” St Peter told the first Christians: “Put all your hope in the grace brought to you by the revelation of Jesus Christ.” Finally, the very last verse of the Bible says: “May the grace of the Lord Jesus be with you all. Amen.”

Humility means recognising the fact that we have done things that make us unworthy of receiving any gift of any kind from God.

This is why St Paul urges us in Colossians: “You were once estranged and of hostile intent through your evil behaviour. Now he has reconciled you, by his death and in that mortal body, to bring you before himself holy, faultless and irreproachable.”

The greatest battle over grace took place 1,500 years ago when an African bishop confronted a British priest named Pelagius. Pelagius said that we can count on Jesus for no more than good example and that grace is nothing more than the law by which God commands us to do good and avoid evil.

St Augustine proved from sacred Scripture how mistaken Pelagius was.

St Augustine noted how God’s grace and free will act together: “St Paul said: ‘By the grace of God I am what I am.’ Then, in order to exhibit also his free will, the Apostle added: ‘His grace within me was not in vain, but I have laboured more abundantly than the others.’

Paul also appealed to the free will when he said: ‘We beseech you that you receive not the grace of God in vain.’ Lest you think that free will can accomplish any good thing without the grace of God, after saying, ‘His grace within me was not in vain, but I have laboured more abundantly,’ Paul added the qualifying clause, ‘Yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.’ In other words: ‘Not I alone, but the grace of God with me.’ And thus, neither was it the grace of God alone, nor was it he himself alone, but it was God’s grace with him.”

jbabendreier@yahoo.co.uk

All set for Rwanda Film Festival 2018

All set for Rwanda Film Festival 2018

By Moses Opobo

All is set for the Rwanda Film Festival to be held in Kigali, with screenings scheduled in different parts of the country.

This year’s festival will take place from September 15-21, under the theme of “Heritage”.

It is the 14th edition of the weeklong action packed festival, which is organised annually by the Kwetu Film Institute, the leading film school in the country.

Also known as Hillywood, the festival seeks to promote local and global awareness, appreciation and understanding of the nascent film industry in Rwanda.

Every year, the festival kicks off with an invites-only opening gala in Kigali, at which the full programme for the festival is officially announced.

Screenings are staged at select venues in Kigali and, as part of the festival’s Travelling Theater initiative, or ‘cinema to the people’, at various upcountry locations as well.

According to Eric Kabera, the festival founder, the upcountry screenings serve not only an artistic, but also a moral purpose. He explains that most of the people that turn up for the upcountry outdoor screenings are usually seeing a film by local filmmakers and actors for the first time.

This year, in line with the theme of Heritage, some of the film screenings will be staged by Lake Kivu in Rubavu District, Western Province.

“This year, one of our advisory boards from the Oscars suggested to have our film festival moved by the lake, and now we are getting to take the movies there by the beach, the heritage of the Great Lakes region,” revealed Eric Kabera.

Commenting on the theme of Heritage, Kabera described cinema as “the most powerful weapon used to preserve and share a heritage, be it cultural or traditional.

“Cinema provides us with the power to understand, explore and build our own identities. Through cinema, we are able to see and understand what Africa was like in the independence struggle in the 60s, and what the world looked like after the two World Wars, what our ancestors did to survive when there was no car, airplanes or all the other commodities we have today. We cross through generations, to reshape and understand our past, build our present while we foresee our future.”

“New generations are built through what they inherit from their fore fathers. The stories we tell today, and how we tell them will shape the future of our children, their children, and many generations to come.”

The festival will further explore the link between cinema and heritage, with screenings of films from across the African continent and the African diaspora communities around the world. These will be complimented by an international selection of films that explore the heritage of different nations across the globe.

“Our rich and varied cultural heritage has a profound power to help build our nation. When Nelson Mandela said those words during a speech, he was referring to his nation of South Africa, but this is something that we can shape through the entire world.

“Learning to understand and embrace our differences by looking at our varied heritages is a weapon that we can use to connect and bring all of us together,” Kabera added.

post appeared on newtimes.co.rw

Kenyans wins 6 awards at the 2018 AMVCAs, with movie ’18 Hours’ bagging 3

Kenyans wins 6 awards at the 2018 AMVCAs, with movie ’18 Hours’ bagging 3

Kenyan movie 18 hours has won 3 awards in the 2018 Africa Magic Viewers’ Choice Awards (2018 AMVCAs). The movie had received 5 nominations in the competition.

Kenyans won a total of 6 awards in the 2018 AMVCAs and the list is below.

  • Best movie East Africa – 18 Hours
  • Best overall movie – 18 Hours
  • Best picture editor movie/TV series – Mark Maina (18 Hours)
  • Best actress in a comedy (Movie/TV series) – Nyce Wanjeri (Auntie Boss)
  • Best documentary – The Flesh Business
  • Best Indigenous language movie or TV series – Supa Modo

The full list of winners of the 2018 AMVCAs as announced yesterday is as follows:

BEST SHORT FILM OR ONLINE VIDEO

PENANCE MICHAEL ‘AMA PSALMIST’ AKINROGUNDE – Winner
THE HOUSEWIFE JAY FRANKLIN JITUBOH
TOLU NADINE IBRAHIM
LODGERS KENI OGUNLOLA
TANWA.. THE CHILD WE WANTED ADENIKE ADEBAYO

BEST DOCUMENTARY

THE FLESH BUSINESS – DENIS WANJOHI MAINA – Winner
NIGHTFALL IN LAGOS JAMES AMUTA
GOD’S WIVES BOLANLE OLUKANNI
OMIDAN, STYLES DEFUNCT BY AYAWORANHO3D ADEREMI DAVIES
CALABAR CARNIVAL: WHAT THE PEOPLE THINK OGHENEFEGO OFILI

BEST INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE MOVIE OR TV SERIES – HAUSA

MANSOOR – ALI NUHU – Winner
UMAR SANDA KAMAL S ALKALI
DADIN KOWA SABON SALO AREWA24
UWAR BARI HAMISU LAMIDO IYANTAMA
RASHINSANI TIANA JOHNSON

BEST INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE MOVIE OR TV SERIES – IGBO

BOUND – LILIAN AFEGBAI – Winner
OFUOBI VICTOR IYKE
UWA NA EME NTUGHARI TIANA JOHNSON
OGE NKEM TIANA OBOYI JOHNSON
EGO MALAYSIA IYOOH JAMES CHIDOZIE

BEST INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE MOVIE OR TV SERIES – YORUBA

ETIKO ONIGEDU – FEMI ADEBAYO – Winner
ALAKITI ABIODUN JIMOH, JUMOKE ODETOLA
ADABA ADEBAYO SALAMI
EGUN IRAN KINNI OYINDAMOLA AWOTIDEBE
OSUN SENGESE IBIRONKE OJO

BEST INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE MOVIE OR TV SERIES – SWAHILI

SUPA MODO – SARIKA HEMI LAKHANI – Winner
T-JUNCTION AMIL ISSA SHIVJI
KERU VICTOR GATONYE
MKAZA MWANA TELLYRENCE WAYONGO
PETU NA GARU SYLONE MALALO

BEST MOVIE SOUTHERN AFRICA

THE ROAD TO SUNRISE – SHEMU JOYAH – Winner
DESCENT AWAL ABDULFATAI
SALUTE! PHILIPPE TALAVERA
JOMAKO BLACK DEMOCRACY ABRAHAM KABWE
NYASALAND JOYCE MHANGO CHAVULA

BEST MOVIE EAST AFRICA

18 HOURS – PHOEBE RUGURU – Winner
DEVIL’S CHEST HASSAN MAGEYE
THE FORBIDDEN KIZITO SAMUEL SAVIOUR
RAIN MATHEW & ELEANOR NABWISO
BELLA MATT BISH

BEST LIGHTING DESIGNER MOVIE OR TV SERIES

TATU – AKPE ODODORU, TUNDE AKINNIYI – Winner
KADA RIVER GODWIN GATTA
HIDDEN AGBO KELLY
LOTANNA TOKA MCBAROR
CHILDREN OF MUD SUNDAY OLALEKAN

BEST OVERALL MOVIE

18 HOURS – PHOEBE RUGURU – Winner
POTATO POTAHTO SHIRLEY FRIMPONG-MANSO
ALTER EGO MOSES INWANG/ESTHER EYIBIO
DEVIL’S CHEST HASSAN MAGEYE
DESCENT AWAL ABDULFATAI
THE ROAD TO SUNRISE SHEMU JOYAH

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

ISOKEN – LYDIA FORSON – Winner
TATU TOYIN ABRAHAM
BANANA ISLAND GHOST DORCAS FAPSON
TATU FUNLOLA AOFIYEBI-RAIMI
BLACKROSE EBELE OKARO
ALTER EGO EMEM INWANG

BEST WRITER (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

ALTER EGO – PATRICK NNAMANI/KOYE O/MOSES INWANG – Winner
IDEMUZA ALOAYE OMOAKE
SOUL TIE KEHINDE JOSEPH
IDAHOSA TRAILS STANLEE OHIKHUARE
18 HOURS NJUE KEVIN
THE TORTURE MULINDWA RICHARD
HAKKUNDE TOMI ADESINA

BEST TELEVISION SERIES

GINA AND FRIENDS PAUL IGWE
PROFESSOR JOHNBULL – CHILDLESS WIVES TCHIDI CHIKERE
PAPA AJASCO RELOADED WALE ADENUGA
THIS IS IT DOLAPO ADELEKE(LOWLA DEE)
RELATIVES TUNDE ADEGBOLA

BEST PICTURE EDITOR MOVIE/TV SERIES

18 HOURS – MARK MAINA – Winner
IDEMUZA ALOAYE OMOAKE
ALTER EGO MOSES INWANG/TUNDE BAKARE
HAKKUNDE ASURF OLUSEYI
HIDDEN JIBRIL MAILAFIA

BEST MAKE UP ARTIST MOVIE/TV SERIES

TATU – THELMA OZY SMITH, HAKEEM EFFECT ONILOGBO – Winner
OJUKOKORO (GREED) SANDRA OYIANA
WHAT LIES WITHIN CYNTHIA UBUBA
DISGUISE HAKEEM EFFECT
LOTANNA NNENA EMEKALAM

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

NEW MONEY – FALZ – Winner
BANANA ISLAND GHOST SAIDI BALOGUN
BANANA ISLAND GHOST TOMIWA EDUN
IDAHOSA TRAILS KUNLE IDOWU
OKAFOR’S LAW GABRIEL AFOLAYAN
BETRAYAL WALE OJO

BEST ART DIRECTOR MOVIE OR TV SERIES

LOTANNA – TUNJI AFOLAYAN – Winner
TATU DON OMOPE, UZOMA MIKE EBUKA, EBUNOLUWA FATOGUN
ISOKEN JADE OSIBERU
IDAHOSA TRAILS STANLEE OHIKHUARE
CHILDREN OF MUD IMOH UMOREN
HIDDEN YUSUF HASAN

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHER MOVIE OR TV SERIES

OKAFOR’S LAW – YINKA EDWARD – Winner
TATU AKPE ODODORU
IDEMUZA DICKSON GODWIN
T-JUNCTION LESTER MILLADO
THE TORTURE RWAMUSIGAZI KYAKUNZIRE
ALTER EGO BISHOP BLUNT/ADEOYE ADENIYI

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

AUNTIE BOSS – NYCE WANJERI – Winner
BACK UP WIFE BIMBO ADEMOYE
EXCESS LUGGAGE QUEEN NWOKOYE
THE BIG FAT LIE RITA DOMINIC
10 DAYS IN SUN CITY ADESUA ETOMI
ISOKEN DAKORE AKANDE

BEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

ALTER EGO – OMOTOLA JALADE EKEINDE – Winner
THE TORTURE AGABA JOAN
WITNESS BOX KEIRA HEWATCH
CHILDREN OF MUD MIRIAM KAYODE
BELLA CINDERELLA SANYU
BLACKROSE LILIAN ECHELON

BEST DIRECTOR MOVIE

ISOKEN – JADE OSIBERU – Winner
ALTER EGO MOSES INWANG
IDEMUZA ALOAYE OMOAKE
HAKKUNDE ASURF OLUSEYI
TATU DON OMOPE
THE TORTURE MULINDWA RICHARD
POTATO POTAHTO SHIRLEY FRIMPONG-MANSO

BEST SOUND EDITOR MOVIE OR TV SERIES

TATU – KOLADE MORAKINYO – Winner
IDAHOSA TRAILS STANLEE OHIKHUARE
ALTER EGO ZEZOM GNAWNI
OJUKOKORO (GREED) DAYO THOMPSON
HAKKUNDE JAMES COON FALCON

BEST SOUND TRACK MOVIE OR TV SERIES

TATU – EVELLE – Winner
MO TOM KOROLUK
BANANA ISLAND GHOST ENYI OMERUAH AND FUNMBI OGUNBANWO
BELLA ANDREW AHUURA
IDAHOSA TRAILS ORIRI OSAYAMORE
18 HOURS JACKTONE OKORE

BEST COSTUME DESIGNER MOVIE OR TV SERIES

THE BRIDGE – NGOZI OBASI AND JAMES BESSINONE – Winner
TATU YOLANDA OKEREKE
ISOKEN JADE OSIBERU
POTATO POTAHTO CHRISTIE BROWN
HAKKUNDE JOAN GBEFWI

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

SIDECHIC GANG – ADJETEY ANANG Winner
ALTER EGO WALE OJO
BENEVOLENCE KALU IKEAGWU
THE TORTURE RUSHABIRO RAYMOND
KETEKE ADJETEY ANANG
ESOHE CHRIS ATTOH

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY (MOVIE/TV SERIES)

DR MEKAM KALU IKEAGWU
THE BIG FAT LIE BLOSSOM CHUKWUJEKWU
EXCESS LUGGAGE IK OGBONNA
GUYNMAN JIMMY ODUKOYA
POTATO POTAHTO OC UKEJE
A MILLION BABY ODUNLADE ADEKOLA

BEST MOVIE WEST AFRICA

ISOKEN – JADE OSIBERU – Winner
POTATO POTAHTO SHIRLEY FRIMPONG-MANSO
ALTER EGO MOSES INWANG/ESTHER EYIBIO
TATU DON OMOPE, YOLANDE OKEREKE, SEGUN ARINZE, TOLU AWOBIYI
CHILDREN OF MUD IMOH UMOREN
LOTANNA IFAN MICHAEL

Trailblazer Award

Bisola – Winner

Industry Merit Award

Tunde Kelani – Winner

First published by hapa kenya

10-Year-Old Ghanaian ‘DJ Switch’ Will Melt Your Heart

10-Year-Old Ghanaian ‘DJ Switch’ Will Melt Your Heart

“Forget all your worries and let’s party.”

It’s an irresistible command from a 10-year-old girl standing on a box behind a DJ booth, tapping her feet and shaking her hips.

Her name is Erica Armah Bra-Bulu Tandoh, also known as DJ Switch, and she’s the subject of a video released on Monday by BBC News Africa. It currently has 8.3 million views on Facebook and nearly 4.5 million views on Twitter.

According to her personal website, Tandoh is from Suaman Dadieso in the western region of Ghana. Even before the BBC video, she’s had her share of fame. Last year, she won top prize on a TV program in Ghana called TV3 Talented Kids. In April, she dropped this music video collab with her mama (who has a lovely voice!) called “Deceiver.” And in May, she deejayed at the Ghana DJ Awards, entering the stage on a horse and a pink-feathered jacket.

In addition to her DJ chops, she also raps, dances and plays trumpet and keyboards. She loves school and would like to be a gynecologist when she grows up “to help women,” she told the BBC. Oh, and her favorite food, according to her website, is “rice ball with ground nut soup.”

“I picked the name DJ Switch because I switch up people’s happiness,” she told the BBC.

She certainly made the editors at Goats and Soda smile. And we hope she’ll make you smile, too.

The original article by MALAKA GHARIB appeared on NPR

Rwandan filmmaker nominated for global movie awards

Rwandan filmmaker nominated for global movie awards

Eddie Nsabimana

29 of the films will make their debut world premiere at the festival, which is one of the largest publicly attended film festivals in the world.

Rwandan filmmaker Joël Karekezi’s film The Mercy of the Jungle has been nominated for the 43rd Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), which runs from September 6 to 16 in Canada.

The 91-minute feature film highlights the wars in Congo through the eyes of two soldiers in the jungle, showcasing their struggle, weakness and hope.

Karekezi’s film got the nod among the 46 breakout films from 50 international storytellers, revealed by the Toronto International Film Festival on Tuesday as part of its 2018 Discovery line-up.

“Toronto is one of the biggest film festivals. I do not take that for granted. It is also a big opportunity for filmmakers across the world to showcase their work. It is indeed an honour for me and my team.  This is a huge milestone of course,” Karekezi said.

Should his film win, it will not be Karekezi’s first time to win a film award, having won another back in 2014 for his short film The Pardon at the Amakula Film Festival held in Uganda.

29 of the films, including Karekezi’s, will make their debut world premiere at the festival, which is one of the largest publicly attended film festivals in the world.

About ‘The Mercy of the Jungle’

Set in 1998 at the outset of the Second Congo War, Joël Karekezi’s second feature film is a propulsive odyssey about a pair of Rwandan soldiers navigating both wilderness and personal crises while lost behind enemy lines.

Kivu is the border where the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda meet. It is here, in a dense network of forests and hills, that Karekezi’s engrossing second feature unfolds.

Sergeant Xavier is a veteran of Rwanda’s ethnic conflicts, while Private Faustin is a fresh recruit eager to avenge the killing of his father and brothers. One night, their battalion scrambles away to hunt down a group of rebels, and Xavier and Faustin are left behind just as Congolese militia begin swarming the area.

They have no option but to head west, embarking on a long journey through a hostile landscape teeming with enemy patrols, wildlife, and mercenary mining operations. Thwarted by hunger and illness, the men must learn to rely on each other’s very different skill sets if they are to survive.

The Mercy of the Jungle excels as a propulsive, atmospheric odyssey about resourcefulness and friendship in which the jungle itself is a central character. But Karekezi also inculcates details that speak volumes about the countless smaller tragedies that are the by-products of such wars, above all the forced recruitment of child soldiers.

The senseless losses surrounding Xavier and Faustin grow to the point where neither will be able to fight for their lives without also considering the toll their actions take on others.