Trump hits Baltimore, Rep Cummings in new racist tweets

Trump hits Baltimore, Rep Cummings in new racist tweets

US President Donald Trump was hit with new accusations of racism Saturday after he attacked African-American lawmaker Elijah Cummings and branded the majority black city of Baltimore an “infested mess.”

Trump’s outburst came in a series of sharply worded tweets aimed at Democratic Representative Cummings — a high-profile critic of Trump’s administration whose district covers much of Baltimore.

“Cumming (sic) District is a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess,” the president wrote, calling it “the worst run and most dangerous anywhere in the United States.”

“No human being would want to live there,” he said — in an attack ostensibly provoked by Cummings’ criticism of the harsh conditions facing would-be asylum seekers at the Mexican border.

“Rep. Elijah Cummings has been a brutal bully, shouting and screaming at the great men & women of Border Patrol about conditions at the Southern Border, when actually his Baltimore district is FAR WORSE and more dangerous,” Trump charged.

The president’s morning diatribe ignited a storm of criticism, less than two weeks after the US House of Representatives condemned him for “racist” comments targeting a Somali-born lawmaker.
The top Democrat in Congress, Nancy Pelosi — whose father served as mayor of Baltimore — accused Trump of a “racist” attack.

“@RepCummings is a champion in the Congress and the country for civil rights and economic justice, a beloved leader in Baltimore, and deeply valued colleague,” Pelosi wrote on Twitter.
We all reject racist attacks against him and support his steadfast leadership.”

The Democratic mayor of Baltimore Bernard “Jack” Young — who is black — rejected Trump’s rhetoric as “hurtful and dangerous.”

“It’s completely unacceptable for the political leader of our country to denigrate a vibrant American City like Baltimore, and to viciously attack US Representative Elijah Cummings,” Young wrote in a statement.

Prominent Democratic presidential candidate, Kamala Harris, tweeted that she was “proud” to have her 2020 campaign headquarters in the Cummings district.

“It’s disgraceful the president has chosen to start his morning disparaging this great American city,” said Harris, one of two leading black candidates in the race to succeed Trump.

Cummings himself tweeted: “Mr. President, I go home to my district daily. Each morning, I wake up, and I go and fight for my neighbors. It is my constitutional duty to conduct oversight of the Executive Branch. But it is my moral duty to fight for my constituents.”

As chairman of the House Oversight Committee, Cummings — one of the most prominent African Americans in Congress — has launched investigations into Trump administration policies, including reports of poor treatment at migrant detention centers.

Trump’s attack was reminiscent of his recent, racially-charged criticism of four young Democratic lawmakers, all women of color, who he suggested should “go back” to the “crime infested” places they came from. In fact, three were born in the US and all four are American citizens.

Baltimore, a historic port city, presents a mixed picture, with both handsome and affluent neighborhoods and large poverty-stricken districts. It has one of the country’s highest murder rates.
Cummings’ district is more than 50 percent black — and the city of Baltimore as whole more than 60 percent.

UN Youth envoy launches coding competition to help solve climate crisis and ‘Reboot the Earth’

UN Youth envoy launches coding competition to help solve climate crisis and ‘Reboot the Earth’

Jayathma Wickramanayake’s office describes the competition as a “global hackathon”, where teams of computer programmers, scientists and others, will try to solve a local climate crisis, that may be unique to each location in line with specific community needs, by creating new software, or improving upon existing programs.

The hackathon will take place at United Nations Technology Innovation Labs in five different countries (Malaysia, Finland, India, Egypt and Germany), during August. Through a series of Tech Challenges, one team from each country will be selected to travel to New York City to attend a “Reboot The Earth” awards ceremony, during the UN Climate Summit on September 21.

The winner from each country will get the chance to have their solution showcased at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, in January 2020, and the overall winner has the opportunity of seeing their software proposal developed at one of the UN Technology Innovation Labs.

You can find more details of the competition, and how to enter, here.

In an interview with UN News, Ms. Wickramanayake said that young people are key to solving global climate challenges, and drivers of change and innovation: “With the global climate movement led by young people, the United Nations supports youth’s effort in driving climate action”, said the Sri Lankan-born envoy.

Since the launch of the Youth 2030 Strategy, the United Nations has been scaling up global, regional and national actions to meet young people’s needs, realize their rights and tap their possibilities as agents of change.

As the Youth Envoy explains, Reboot The Earth is about creating a platform for young people to share their best innovative ideas and solutions with the United Nations, making them equal partners in the global fight against the climate crisis:

“Reboot The Earth presents young people with the opportunity to not only showcase their potential and ideas, but also to be recognized at the United Nations Climate Summit in September 2019”

“We’re calling the winners of this year’s hackathon ‘The #ClimateReboot Troops’, and they will have be able to collaborate with the United Nations on a long-term project, to work on, and scale up, solutions that will have a real-life impact in communities.”

High-end streetwear is the latest status symbol for rich millenials

High-end streetwear is the latest status symbol for rich millenials

Luxury streetwear is gaining momentum among rich millennials.

The streetwear subculture has been around for decades, but social media and the rise of athleisure have recently brought it to the forefront of fashion.
Luxury brands like Gucci and Louis Vuitton are incorporating streetwear styles to their looksto appeal to millennials.

Two different fashion worlds have collided, and it’s created a new kind of millennial uniform: luxury streetwear.

The streetwear subculture has been around for decades, originating in skate, surf, and hip-hop cultures, Benjamin Schneider, research analyst at Euromonitor International , told Business Insider. According to him, the most popular streetwear brands today, like Stussy and Supreme, grew slowly throughout the 1980s and 1990s and developed cult-like followings.

“As athletes and hip-hop artists gained influence throughout the 1990s, so did the sportswear brands they wore, increasingly bringing brands like Adidas, Champion, and Nike into the streetwear ecosystem,” he said.

But it wasn’t until social media that streetwear really exploded onto the scene bold logos and graphics resonated with image-obsessed consumers.
“Now that Instagram is the definitive medium for discovering fashion, traditional luxury brands like Gucci and Louis Vuitton have adopted the defining characteristics ofstreetwear, finding bold logos and exclusivity to be key to reaching younger generations,” Schneider said.

It’s making Gucci cool again in 2015, the brand brought on Alessandro Michele as creative director, who led the brand in a millennial and teen-friendly direction by helping Gucci embrace streetwear and the influence of popular culture, Business Insider previously reported . Celebrities like Lil Pump and Kylie Jenner have further popularized the brand through Instagram and music.

And it’s working: Gucci nearly doubled its sales in 2018, with consumers under 35 accounting for 55% of those sales. Michael Kors, Fendi, and Ralph Lauren have also partnered with streetwear brands.

Millennials have a thing for athleisure

But social media isn’t the only factor behind luxury streetwear’s skyrocketing popularity millennials’ appetite for athleisure is also a driving force.
“They like streetwear’s casual and comfortable silhouettes like t-shirts, hoodies, and sneakers, which have become increasingly accepted in work and social spaces alike in the US in the midst of a larger casualization trend,” Schneider said.

And now that streetwear has gone high-end, millennials are also gravitating toward the trend because of its effect on their perceived social status. Luxury streetwear now numbers among other purchases and symbols like fancy baby strollers, second passports, and “ugly” sneakers that people use to demonstrate their status.

The consumers of luxury streetwear may be a niche group but it’s a group that carries a lot of influence on social media. And while the style is seen on both women and men, it’s more popular among the latter, accordingto Schneider.The male millennial knows what the different brands represent, Schneider said, as well as when and where products will be released and how to get them.

South Sudan’s women in uniform work to combat gender-based violence and promote peace

South Sudan’s women in uniform work to combat gender-based violence and promote peace

Source: APO Group on behalf of United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).

About 100 uniformed women serving in South Sudan’s security sector are working towards combatting gender-based violence as well as securing a leading role in the country’s peace process.

The women representing the national police, prison, wildlife and immigration services as well as the fire brigade and South Sudan People’s Defence Forces, met at two workshops in the capital Juba to discuss how they can be involved in reforming the security sector by including gender issues.

The discussion was driven by UN Resolution 1325, which emphasizes the importance of a gender perspective in the negotiation of peace agreements and their implementation. A topical issue indeed, as the revitalized peace deal signed in September 2018 is yet to be fully implemented.

 “I will be using this knowledge [from the workshop] to address my fellow women in uniform and also those who are not to tell them how important we are in that process,” said Captain Najore Paul Josephine from South Sudan’s National Police Service.

“We are equal to the men. Whatever we have, let our voices be heard as women, let’s stand for peace.”

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan, in collaboration with the uniformed forces, organized the workshops on how various peace and security resolutions can be implemented through national action plans.

They also discussed the peacekeeping mission’s role in protecting civilians and building durable peace, as well as its support for the inclusion of 35 per cent female representatives in all aspects of the peace accord implementation.

“We want women to feel a sense of empowerment, because there are provisions for raising their status and for bringing equality. We want to inform them so that they can educate the wider population,” said UNMISS Military Gender and Protection Advisor, Commander Janet MacDougall.

Emmy Coelho, the UN Police Women’s Network Coordinator, echoed these sentiments.

“If you really want long-term peace, we need to engage women. Sometimes they don’t have a voice, but they need to be part of the process,” she said.

Male workshop participants were also keen to boost the status of women, whether they wear uniforms or not.

 “We are encouraging women to participate in every field. We need them to realise that women are not weak. They are as strong as men,” said Lieutenant General James Pui Yak, Inspector General of the South Sudan National Police Service. He added that women in the security sector play a crucial role both in combatting gender-based violence and in assisting victims of such aggressions.

30-year military veteran, Brigadier General Abouch Bol, spoke strongly about the vital role of women.

“Peace is in our hands. We are the ones to bring it,” she said. “Being in uniform does not mean we are going to fight, it means we are here to protect the public.”

Theresa Siricio Wani, the Chairperson of the Sudan African National Union, called for women to unite and help each other progress in life and society.

“For us to move forward, we have to form women’s solidarity. That way we will climb the ladder easily and incorporate women’s issues. We must do it together and be more effective.”

 

High Level Delegation visits Yei River State to intensify Ebola preparedness.

High Level Delegation visits Yei River State to intensify Ebola preparedness.

Source: APO Group on behalf of World Health Organization (WHO)

A high-level delegation led by Dr Makur Matur Kariom, Undersecretary, Ministry of Health and Mr Alain Noudehou, UN Resident/Humanitarian Coordinator and comprising Ambassadors of donor countries, heads of United Nations (UN) agencies and Representatives of international non-governmental organizations visited Yei town.

The objective of the visit was to among others reassure local authorities of the continued support of the development partners and the one UN in South Sudan; secure sustained commitment of the local authorities to the EVD preparedness efforts and publicize in the national press key messages to the general public regarding Ebola preparedness.

South Sudan is one of the four priority one countries (Burundi, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda) prioritized by WHO to enhance preparedness and operational readiness based on the proximity to the outbreak area as well as the capacity to manage Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The risk of transmission of EVD into countries that share borders with DRC, including South Sudan, has been classified as “very high” by WHO. Cases of EVD have recently been confirmed in Uganda, Goma and in Ariwara, a town in DRC located just 70km from the border with South Sudan.

“Diseases such as Ebola don’t respect boundaries, race or religion so all must ensure that they work together to prevent its cross border transmission into South Sudan”, said Mr Noudehou. He also reiterated the commitment of the UN to continue to support EVD preparedness in the country under the leadership of WHO.

As a priority one country for EVD preparedness, the Ministry of Health, National Task Force, WHO and partners are implementing the National EVD Preparedness Plan, including vaccinating front-line health workers, educating people about prevention and response measures, conducting screening at multiple locations to help with early detection of cases, training personnel in infection prevention and control as well as being preparing for safe and dignified burial processes if needed.

“Although South Sudan has not confirmed any EVD case, implementation of effective public health measures is critical to manage the risk posed by South Sudan’s complex humanitarian context, the history of previous (EVD) outbreaks, increasing global travel and proximity to DRC”, said Dr Olushayo Olu, WHO Country Representative to South Sudan.

At the end of the visit, the Governor of the state, the state Health Ministry and partners on the ground reiterated their commitment to intensify key interventions and increase public awareness by providing adequate information through all communication channels, religious and community leaders.

In his closing remarks, the Undersecretary, Dr Makur appreciated WHO and other partners for the strong partnership and support rendered to enhance capacities to effectively implement the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005) and address the threats of EVD and other infectious diseases.

Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is one of the most fatal and highly infectious diseases known to the world. The on-going outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is the second largest outbreak reported globally. As of 13 July 2019, 2 489 confirmed cases and 1 665 deaths have been reported.

WHO is working in Jubek, Gbudue, Tambura, Maridi, Torit, Wau and Yei River states alongside their respective state health ministries and partners to provide strategic public health leadership and support required to ensure that all the high-risk counties are operationally ready and prepared to implement timely and effective EVD risk mitigation, detection, and response measures.